Open Access

Erratum: Parental phonological memory contributes to prediction of outcome of late talkers from 20 months to 4 years: a longitudinal study of precursors of specific language impairment

  • Dorothy VM Bishop1Email author,
  • Georgina Holt1,
  • Elizabeth Line1,
  • David McDonald1,
  • Sarah McDonald1 and
  • Helen Watt1
Journal of Neurodevelopmental DisordersAdvancing Interdisciplinary Research20157:16

https://doi.org/10.1186/s11689-015-9110-0

Received: 11 May 2015

Accepted: 11 May 2015

Published: 30 May 2015

The original article was published in Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders 2012 4:3

Erratum

We have discovered an error in our article on “Parental phonological memory contributes to prediction of outcome of late talkers from 20 months to 4 years: a longitudinal study of precursors of specific language impairment” [1]. The account of how OCDI scores were converted to standardized scores (Page 4, column 2, section headed ‘Assessments at 18 to 20 months of age’) is incorrect. Although we explored the use of regression methods to derive norms, we decided against this approach because of skew in the data. In the final analysis we took existing normative data [2] for the age range 18.5–21 months and used the cumulative frequency distribution of word production scores to identify a cutoff. We used OCDI items 13–416 (i.e. excluding animal sounds), as many children in the normative sample did not have data on items 1–12. The cumulative frequency for 11 words was 16.4 % and for 10 words was 12.4 %, and so we used a cutoff of 10 words or less to correspond to one SD below average.

The analyses in the article were computed using this cutoff, and so none of the results or conclusions are altered: the correction is made to ensure that the description of the method in the article matches what was done.

Notes

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford

References

  1. Bishop DVM, Holt G, Line E, McDonald D, McDonald S, Watt H. Parental phonological memory contributes to prediction of outcome of late talkers from 20 months to 4 years: a longitudinal study of precursors of specific language impairment. J Neurodev Disord. 2012;4:3.PubMed CentralPubMedView ArticleGoogle Scholar
  2. Hamilton A, Plunkett K, Schafer G. Infant vocabulary development assessed with a British Communicative Development Inventory. J Child Lang. 2000;27:689–705.PubMedView ArticleGoogle Scholar

Copyright

© Bishop et al.; licensee BioMed Central. 2015

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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