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Table 4 Correlations between empathic behaviour and emotional reactivity

From: Reactivity to fearful expressions of familiar and unfamiliar people in children with autism: an eye-tracking pupillometry study

  Peak amplitude Peak latency
  Familiar Unfamiliar Familiar Unfamiliar
ASD group     
EmQue total .06 (.03) -.09 (-.11) -.20 (-.19) -.20 (-.19)
†Emotional contagion -.33 (-.29) -.20 (-.17) -.11 (-.12) .43 (.41)
†#Attention .18 (.12) -.07 (-.11) -.17 (-.17) -.25 (-.22)
†Prosocial behaviour .21 (.17) -.03 (.004) -.18 (-.18) -.55* (-.53*)
TD group     
EmQue total -.14 (-.15) -.34 (-.35) .16 (.16) -.29 (-.29)
†Emotional contagion .12 (.12) -.28 (-.29) .28 (.26) -.33 (-.32)
†#Attention -.19 (-.19) -.44* (-.44*) -.004 (.000) -.06 (-.06)
†Prosocial behaviour -.32 (-.33) -.08 (-.08) .09 (.09) -.30 (-.30)
  1. This table shows the Pearson correlations (two-tailed) between everyday empathic behaviour (EmQue scores) and emotional reactivity as indexed by peak amplitude (familiar, unfamiliar) and peak latency (familiar, unfamiliar, across familiarity conditions). The r-values for partial correlations, controlling for the effect of cognitive ability (MSEL standard score), are in parentheses, and r-values outside parentheses are without controlling for this effect. † EmQue sub-scales, # Attention to Others’ Feelings, *P ≤ .05. Significant correlations are in bold.